Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter 47mm: Hands-On Review [01 733 7705 4134-07 5 23 14FC]

Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter 47mm: Hands-On Review [01 733 7705 4134-07 5 23 14FC] - Dial close up with watch on its side with crown up and venting crown activated

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

Hands-On Review: Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter 47mm [01 733 7705 4134-07 5 23 14FC]

This mountainous 47mm wide Oris is truly gigantic in size at a whopping 47mm wide and has a substantial 17.7mm case depth. It is not only Oris’s first watch of its kind; but, ‘the world’s first automatic watch with a mechanical altimeter’. (With the world’s first manual wind watch with a mechanical altimeter, being taken by the far more expensive Breva Genie 02 – with an eye-watering list price of $132,000).

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

The ProPilot Altimeter is an unsurprising watch coming from Oris – a brand that has made a name for itself by making mechanical watches, with useful complications, at an affordable price point. And this watch also acts as a spiritual sequel to the Oris Aquis Depth Gauge watch: but, instead of measuring depth diving under water – the altitude flying up and into the air.

Cessna.206h.stationair2.arp
Cessna 206H Stationair 2 at Kemble Airfield, Gloucestershire, England – By Arpingstone [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
It accomplishes two vital things that Pilots will need, packed into something that can be worn on the wrist in the form of a gargantuan watch – the time and altitude.

Buy this Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter 47mm [01 733 7705 4134-07 5 23 14FC] with a feet scale from our shop here.

Who Is This Watch For?

While this watch is part of the ProPilot collection, bearing a great deal in common with its smaller siblings; with the highly legible dial, knurled bezel edge inspired by jet engines, and general design blueprint, I can see it being worn by more than just pilots.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

The revolutionary mechanical altimeter is a complication that very few people will get to actually see in action. The altitude graduation on the bezel goes up to 15,000 feet in 100 feet increments (or 4,500m with markers every 25 meters) which I can see being of use for not just pilots of small planes (as commercial planes have pressurised cabins while flying at around 40,000 feet); but, for mountain climbers, skiers, explorers, or even research scientists who work at altitude.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

As a guy who enjoys maintain climbing a great deal, and would love to get a pilots licence, I can see that having an altimeter function on a watch as not an expensive toy but a tool that I could really utilise. Using an altimeter in combination with an OS map would bring a whole new perspective to navigating a mountain range. The fact that it’s not electronic so has no batteries to run out of juice, with it having a mechanical barometer, is all to the Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter’s great advantage.

But it’s important to take into consideration the scale of mountains. That the altimeter will not be able to give a reliable reading past where the markings end. To put this into perspective the top 10 highest mountains in Europe range from 4,646m to 5,642m in height meaning the scale on the watch will be short of 1Km or so just in Europe on land alone – and that’s before we consider the vast magnitude of all the mountains in Asia, the Americas, and the rest of the world, with 14 mountains over 8000 meters!

Massif du Mont-Blanc (hiver panoramique)
The Mont Blanc massif, view from the winter sports resort of Les Contamines-Montjoie. Photo By User:Saruman (Own Work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
At 47mm wide and with two crowns protruding from its casing, the Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter watch is by no means an insignificant watch. It possesses with it a good amount of heft thanks to its beefy brushed stainless steel construction, that assures the wearer of its tool watch identity.

Oris’s goal when making watches is not so much to make prestigious watches from exotic materials with complications that will never get used. But rather to build exceptionally good quality mechanical watches, with useful functions, at an affordable price point.

Case And Dial

0175176974164-0752014FC_main01 733 7705 4164-07 5 23 14FC_mainThis Oris ProPilot Altimeter resembles a Big Crown ProPilot Date that’s been engulfed by another monstrously large watch; whom has been subjected to nuclear irradiation – hence the additional crown growth by the 4 o’clock.

The general stylisation of the ProPilot Altimeter is consistent with the other watches in the ProPilot family – but is significantly larger. Its matt black dial with markings and Arabic numerals imbued with the white Superluminova variant BG W9 maintains excellent legibility. The red tipped seconds hand enables it to melt away when not required and helps to maintain a very clear dial design despite all the tasks it must accomplish. And the coin edge pattern on the bezel inspired by jet engines is also shared between these watches.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

The reverse of the watch features a special engraved solid case back that converts meters into feet on a circular scale. A welcome addition, but I question how useful a conversion table is on the underside of a watch?

On this watch, we do not get to see Oris’s famed red rotor through an exhibition back. But as doing this would likely add an additional mill or two to the depth of the casing, it would push its thickness to nearly 20mm thick – making the watch just too gargantuan to realistically wear.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

Altimeter

Where this watch is so utterly unique, is no doubtably the ability to calculate its altitude relative to sea level – which is one of the 6 most fundamental cockpit instruments that a pilot requires to fly a plane.

This function is controlled by the additional crown set by the 4 o’clock. When it’s screwed in the watch is rated as water-resistant to 100m; and, requires unscrewing in order to measure air pressure. Once out and activated, the red mark reminds the wearer that it shouldn’t be subjected to water that may get inside of the altimeter mechanism. But Oris has managed to add a PTFE vapour barrier to prevent ambient moisture from compromising its internals.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

When handling this ProPilot Altimeter watch I was a little surprised by the amount of force required to push this venting crown back into the sealed position, which is something to consider when you get your hands on one.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

A red marker indicates atmospheric air pressure and the yellow points (on the opposing side) to altitude. Pulling out this crown into its second position will allow it to be set to a known pressure (by getting the red hand to line up with the red triangle by the 6 marker), or a known altitude (by turning the crown until the yellow marker matches the current altitude around the outer bezel of the watch).

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

The barometer used in this ProPilot not only points to the current altitude around the outer bezel, with the yellow hand but also the air pressure of the surrounding environment: located in a recessed bezel around the central dial, pointed to with a red hand. It uses the metric measurement of pressure hPa (hectopascal), the standard for measuring atmospheric pressure.

Strap And Clasp

The Oris strap is of this sturdy green synthetic material with the unusual interhorn width of 23mm. The brushed stainless steel clasp takes inspiration from the seatbelt buckles in aircraft, with a single flap that is easily pulled up to undo the clasp.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

The functional textile strap is relatively inconspicuous but maintains its ProPilot utilitarian look with its rouged feel and simple clasp. The strap does not require a loud eye-catching aesthetic as the Herculean scale of this watch is all that’s needed for grabbing people’s attention.

Movement

The movement used in this watch is the Oris 733, based on a SW 200-1. It has three central hands that tell the hours, minutes and seconds, and a date window at the 3 o’clock position. The date is instantaneously changing, and can be quickly adjusted with the crown. The seconds are also ‘hacking‘ so will stop when the crown is pulled out for accurate time setting.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

The time and date are both controlled by a signed crown positioned on the edge of the casing at the 2 o’clock position.

Winding wise, the Oris ProPilot Altimeter’s movement is an automatic that will wind bidirectional (with a red Oris rotor hidden beneath the solid case back). Inside the movement are 26 jewels. The escapement oscillates at 28,800 v/h (4Hz). And it has an approximate power reserve of 38 hours.

Comparison

The Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter of 47mm is not just a tool watch exclusively for pilots of private aircraft’s, but serious mountain climbers, skiers and explorers too. The innovative combination of an altimeter in an automatic watch is a feature made to be used by people who are very passionate about their hobby or job, but without costing the price of a small house.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter

Take the price of the Breva Genie 02 for example – about $132,000. An amount of money which I feel a pilot would far more likely spend putting towards a plane. In addition to this, the asking price for the Breva Genie 02 new is also about the same as ‘the world’s first commercial jetpack’ – I know which one I would rather have.

Yes, the Breva Genie 02 is the more horologically impressive watch between the two; and, is also marketed as an explores watch. But I question if this Breva watch would really be brought by explorers when there are so many tried and tested alternatives available (which would give far more accurate readings). I think that this is where these two watches differ from each other. The Oris Big Crown ProPiolot Altimeter has been made for explorers of the sky and mountains at an affordable price point. While the Breva Genie 02 has an altimeter function as a means to show off their horological ability. When buying an Oris watch, it’s not so much a prestigious badge of honour, but rather a watch made to be used and abused at a price that can be afforded.

Verdict

Its mega size would look very out-of-place on anyone with skinny wrists, and really requires somebody with large wrists for it to aesthetically work. The ProPilot Altimeter is not only a very large watch but is the largest model available from the Big Crown ProPilot watch collection.

In conclusion, the Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter is an especially unique watch that is really very different to everything else out there with its functional mechanical altimeter. Oris have combined 75 years of experience in making watches for pilots that results in this distinctive watch at a remarkably affordable price.

This Altimeter watch is available with the altitude scale in feet or meters, and strap options between a metal bracelet, a leather strap, or a textile strap in green black or grey.

The RRP starts from £2350 with our shop selling them at a considerable discount.

Buy this Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter 47mm [01 733 7705 4134-07 5 23 14FC] with a feet scale from our shop here.

The other Pro Pilot watches with a feet scales here.

Or buy this ProPilot Altimeter watch with a Meter scale here.

The Worlds First Automatic Watch With A Mechanical Altimeter Continue reading Oris Big Crown ProPilot Altimeter 47mm: Hands-On Review [01 733 7705 4134-07 5 23 14FC]

Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse: Unboxing Review

Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] Macro Photo In Black Box © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The New Speedmaster For The 21st Century

Unboxing Review: Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001]

First thoughts

Initially, when opening the box for the Omega X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001]. I was a little apprehensive: this, is a quartz movement watch, from a company that increasingly wants to be seen as a truly luxury brand, by making more mechanical watches. The bright green and blue colours are strong and catch the eye, but lacks a little sophistication in my option. But over time it’s a design that has really grown on me.

You Can Buy This Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] Here.

Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] Dial Closeup © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Dial Closeup of Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse
The casing is built from dark looking grade 2 titanium with an excellent matte brush finish, which maintains its crispness around stylistic detailing, and reminds the wearer of its status as a tool watch. It is a comfortable 45mm wide with two buttons on either side of the face keeping multiple lines of strong symmetry.

Bezel, button and crown closeup of Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Bezel, button and crown closeup of Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001]
The Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker is a modern updated edition of the original. Where’s the Moonwatch contains relics of the 60’s with a manually wound movement, constructed of stainless steel and a hesalite crystal face. The contemporary X-33 Skywalker uses the vastly more accurate ‘Omega calibre 5619’, a quartz TCXO (temperature compensated quartz oscillator) movement. And modern updated materials, currently better suited to the job. It is built from a light and strong titanium variety, a sapphire crystal protects the dial of the ana-digi face, and has a scratch resistant brushed blue ceramic bezel. The watch has also had significant input from real astronauts like Jean-François Clervoy to give it the functions that astronauts require on a mission in space. And as such has enjoyed adoption by genuine aviators and astronauts alike.

Complications

Bezel and button closeup of Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Bezel and button closeup of Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001]
This is not a watch built for the masses but a precision engineered piece built with a specific goal in mind. Some of the functions that it has are a ‘Mission Elapse Time Function’ (MET) which can tell astronauts how much time has passed or time remaining on their mission. Three time zones are set by calibrating the primary time at GMT + 0, and adding or subtracting time from this for the two secondary time zones. It also features:

  • 24-hour time display
  • Day of the year
  • Date (perpetual calendar)
  • Week of the year
  • Chronograph (stopwatch)
  • Count down timer
  • 3 Phase Elapsed Times
  • 3 Alarms
  • Energy saving setting
  • And backlighting for excellent dial legibility

Unboxing

The X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse watch comes in a large matte black presentation box, with green accents, and a Solar Impulse badge emblazoned on the insert opposite the watch. The lightweight NATO strap follows this further, by taking its two shades of green and blue directly from the badge, to live on its wearer’s wrist.

The Build

The watch keeps focus on its goal and is rated as 30m water-resistant. This is not a diving watch and was not designed to come anywhere near water, but instead to endure the vacuum of space. The ESA have measured the watch’s performance in a laboratory vacuum chamber, in temperatures ranging from -45°C to 75°C (228°K to 348°K). An environment that would be unlikely for any astronaut to ever endure. And a centrifuge to subject it to the high levels of g-force that astronauts will need to endure during take-off.

The solid case back protrudes out of the base of the watch more than you would initially expect. This is due to the location of the alarms vents being on the back of the watch as to keep it concealed from view, and to not impede the projection of its audible alarm.

Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] Macro Photo In Black Box © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse sitting on a black cushion
The Bi-Directional Rotating bezel is a ceramic blue that matches the NATO strap well with Arabic numerals and indexes in green emission Super-Luminova. On the first ledge under the sapphire crystal dial are sub-second markers in white, contrasting with its green background. On the next rim are running second markers being broken up by subtracted hour indicators. Again all printed in white but on a matte blue background.

Second bezel and button closeup of Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001] © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Second bezel and button closeup of Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse [318.92.45.79.03.001]
The face is constructed of three horizontal LCD lines, a green tipped seconds hand, and white-tipped minute and hour hands. With the Omega Speedster Professional’s signature between the centre and three o’clock hour indicator.

Verdict

Ultimately the Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker (Solar Impulse) is a success in that it’s created for real astronauts and pilots as a useful tool that they will want to use without compromisations, other than as an expensive gimmick. It was created for a very specialised environment that few people will venture into. The watch is a rare glimpse of the future of watches, and their part in the exotic affair of space exploration.

This watch, the ‘Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse’ is a limited edition of only 1924 pieces.

Buy the Solar Impulse edition here from our shop while stock lasts at a discounted price (ref. 318.92.45.79.03.001 Solar Impulse).

Or buy the standard edition with a titanium Oyster strap from our shop here. (ref. 318.90.45.79.01.001)

Continue reading Omega Speedmaster X-33 Skywalker Solar Impulse: Unboxing Review

Oris ProDiver Chronograph: Unboxing Review [01 774 7683 7154-Set]

Unboxing Review: Oris ProDiver Chronograph 01 774 7683 7154-Set1Oris ProDiver Chronograph sitting on supplied manual. © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

A Titan 1000m Dive-watch

Unboxing Review: Oris ProDiver Chronograph [01 774 7683 7154-Set]

There’s simply no way around the fact that this watch is gigantic. The ProDiver has a huge 51mm case diameter and is nearly 2cm thick – definitely not something that will fit under a shirt cuff. This watch is so large that even the big Rolex Deepsea (ref. 116660) starts to appear small when sat next to the ProDiver. Although the ProDiver is only just water-resistant to a mere 1000m with the Deepsea enduring the far more sensible and useful depth of 3900m, I think the ProDiver would be sufficient for the 99.9% of divers.

Oris ProDiver Chronograph 01 774 7683 7154-Set1Oris have avoided packing the watch in a leather box and have instead paired the ProDiver with a rather nice Pelican like waterproof box that would by its self, retail for about £175. And inside some thoughtfully added professional tools to help you change or adjust the bracelet and an additional black rubber strap.

The watch casing and strap are entirely constructed out of brushed titanium with a slightly two-tone effect on the three links wide bracelet. With an appropriately sized inter-lug width of 26mm to match the dials huge proportions. I was somewhat disappointed to discover that the clasp mechanism on the strap is of the push-button variety, and without an additional safety. Not entirely inspiring confidence for everyone wanting to go diving with this watch on. But by no means a deal breaker for divers and non-divers alike.

The lugs on the Oris ProDiver Chronograph are heavily curved to help the watch hug the wrist of the wearer and be as comfortable as possible. The casing is of a beefy construction and would be ill-suited to anyone with a wrist diameter smaller than the total width of the watch including lugs. So the wearer’s wrist diameter should be greater than the 5cm width of the ProDiver for it to look good. The back of the Oris features a solid case back with Oris signatures and a useful conversion table to convert meters into feet.

Oris ProDiver Chronograph 01 774 7683 7154-Set3

The stainless steel pusher buttons that operate the chronograph complication on the side of the watch are sat low down on the casing as to not catch on clothing; sitting by the 2 and 4-hour markers, and screw down to protect the internals from water damage when under high levels of pressure. The screw down crown is made in a similar style with flanged slits added, to assist in gripping and turning the crown. The ProDiver also features an automatic Helium Escape Valve.

Continue reading Oris ProDiver Chronograph: Unboxing Review [01 774 7683 7154-Set]

Omega Rio 2016 Olympic Limited Edition Seamaster Diver 300m: Hands On Review [522.30.41.20.01.001]

Omega Rio 2016 Olympic Limited Edition Seamaster Diver 300m: Hands On Review [522.30.41.20.01.001] - Laying on its side crown up facing the right

Omega And The Olympic Games (2016)

Hands On Review: Omega Rio 2016 Olympic Limited Edition Seamaster Diver 300m: [522.30.41.20.01.001]

Ever since 1932, Omega has been the Official Timekeeper of 26 Olympic Games. This Rio 2016 Limited Edition Seamaster, of only 3016 pieces, celebrates this rich heritage of Omega’s legacy by timing tens of thousands of Olympic athletes in their pursuit of new athletic records, both personal and international, at each Olympics, with exceptional accuracy from the start to finish line.

Omega OLYMPIC COLLECTION (Seamaster) 522.30.41.20.01.001

This Rio 2016 Limited Edition Seamaster, introduced at BaselWorld 2016, is different to the standard editions in that it’s a hint more colourful with the black bezels numeral’s being filled with red, green, yellow and blue lacquer, each representing the colours of the Olympic rings – which are in turn a representation of all the countries and nations that come together to compete in the Olympic games. It also features a new wave pattern on the dial inspired by Rio and a commemorative case back.

Buy this Omega Rio 2016 Olympic Limited Edition Seamaster Diver 300m 522.30.41.20.01.001 here from our shop.

Olympic Heritage With Omega

The partnership between Omega and the Olympics started 84 years ago with a single swiss watchmaker arriving in Los Angeles in 1932, with 30 split-second chronographs. Today decades of innovations have led to Olympic records being measured with equipment made by Omega, (the Quantum Timer is currently used), that has a maximum variation of only 1 second every 10,000,000 seconds, (which is 1 second every 115 days, 17 hours, 46 minutes, 40 seconds).

Omega OLYMPIC COLLECTION (Seamaster) 522.30.41.20.01.001

Throughout the years working as the Official Timekeeper for the Olympic games, Omega has been at the forefront of technological timing advancements. Continue reading Omega Rio 2016 Olympic Limited Edition Seamaster Diver 300m: Hands On Review [522.30.41.20.01.001]

Oris Divers Sixty-Five With A Fabric Khaki Strap: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 5 20 22]

Oris watch sat with crown up on supplied booklet - Oris Divers Sixty-Five: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 5 20 22]

The Casual Oris Divers Sixty-Five – With a Fabric Strap

Oris Divers Sixty-Five With A Fabric Khaki Strap: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 5 20 22]

This is a review of my favourite Oris watch, but this time on a very sturdy fabric strap.

What’s to like?

This watch is currently my absolute favourite Oris watch at the moment (at the time of writing this article). It holds a design that has tried the tests of time and succeeded. This watch was originally released in, as you may have guessed, way back in 1965. Luckily when Oris relaunched this updated version they didn’t kill what made it so special; but, improved on it with modern manufacturing techniques and newer materials.

(I have previously reviewed this watch on a rubber ‘tropic’ strap and have photos of it on a metal bracelet that can be found from these links)

Oris Divers Sixty-Five: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 5 20 22]

The Fabric Tang Buckle Strap

Oris have given the Divers Sixty-Five a plethora of different strap options to choose from. The boxed numeral versions come in:

  • Black rubber ‘Tropic’
  • Stainless steel bracelet with push – button clasp
  • NATO/G10 fabric strap with a push – button folding clasp
  • Fabric strap with tang buckle – extremely sturdy

And the edition with a dark blue dial, without the boxed numerals, is also available with a dark brown leather strap.

Oris Divers Sixty-Five: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 5 20 22]

Continue reading Oris Divers Sixty-Five With A Fabric Khaki Strap: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 5 20 22]

Omega Seamaster 300m Diver Co-Axial Chronograph 44mm: Hands-On Review [212.92.44.50.99.001 ETNZ]

Omega Seamaster 300m Diver Co-Axial Chronograph 44mm: Hands-On Review [212.92.44.50.99.001 ETNZ]

The Titan ETNZ Seamaster

Hands-On Review: Omega Seamaster 300m Diver Co-Axial Chronograph 44mm [212.92.44.50.99.001 ETNZ]

This Omega Seamaster watch is refreshingly different to the usual stainless steel and metal bracelet norm. This ETNZ special edition Seamaster 300m has an unusually spartan dial, that focuses on functionality, and is of a surprisingly lightweight build for such a big chunky watch.

Continue reading to find out what’s so different with this Seamaster 300m and who this watch is made for…

The Seamaster’s Background

The first Seamaster made by Omega was originally released all the way back in the year 1948, being based on the Omega Marine which was their first water-resistant watch. Today the watch conjures up images of Britain’s best-loved secret agent 007 – James Bond. First seen on the silver screen sat on the wrist of Pierce Brosnan while he outmanoeuvred his enemies in the film GoldenEye that hit theatres in 1995.

The Seamaster was chosen thanks to Lindy Hemming, the costume designer for the film (who’s subsequently worked on five James Bond films), because of its long fruitful heritage of being worn by members of the British Navy, to which Bond belongs to.

You can buy this Omega Seamaster [212.92.44.50.99.001 ETNZ] watch from our shop here.

Omega Seamaster 300m Diver Co-Axial Chronograph 44mm: Hands-On Review [212.92.44.50.99.001 ETNZ] Continue reading Omega Seamaster 300m Diver Co-Axial Chronograph 44mm: Hands-On Review [212.92.44.50.99.001 ETNZ]

Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch 42mm: Unboxing-Review [311.33.42.30.01.001]

Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch 42mm: Unboxing-Review [311.33.42.30.01.001] The Omega Speedmaster held in my hand held up to the front of the supplied box Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch 42mm: Unboxing-Review [311.33.42.30.01.001] © 2016 blog.thewatchsource.co.uk

The Modern Moonwatch Speedmaster Of Today

Unboxing Review: Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch 42mm [311.33.42.30.01.001]

This is the new Moonwatch for the space race lovers who may not be able to afford an original pre-moon 105.012 or post-moon 145.012 Omega Speedmaster, being tested and certified by NASA to endure extremes in temperature, humidity, shock, pressure and vibrations. But unfortunately for some, these rare gems of timepieces also command a high asking price on the second-hand market. Costing 3 or 4 times that of the Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch I’m currently reviewing here (released in 2014). Or this watch could be suited to those who don’t want the hassle of buying a second-hand original. What with finding one in a good condition, with a service history, from a reputable seller, at a good price.

Buy this Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch from our shop here at a discounted price.

Man on Moon photo NASA photo AS15-88-11863 1 August 1971
Man on the Moon – NASA photo AS15-88-11863 – The photograph was taken by Astronaut James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot – Taken on the 1st August 1971. [If you look closely you can just make out the Omega Speedmaster straped to the left wrist of the austonaute in the photo, next to the corner of the USA’s flag.]

Compared to the Original Moonwatch

The Omega Speedmaster 311.33.42.30.01.001 is the closest that a modern Speedmaster has got to the original (but with an Alligator leather strap rather than the bracelet version 311.30.42.30.01.005 found here) and maintains a manual wound movement, a three-dial chronograph, no date function, a black dial, a black tachymeter bezel, a Hesalite crystal and a solid case back. It makes use of the updated calibre 1861 movement that increases the accuracy and reliability of the 321 (pre-moon) movements at 18,000 v\h and the 861 movements at 21,600 v\h (post-moon). 

Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch 42mm- Unboxing-Review [311.33.42.30.01.001] 17
The Speedmaster sitting on the centre of its very large box
Continue reading Omega Speedmaster Professional Moonwatch 42mm: Unboxing-Review [311.33.42.30.01.001]

Oris Divers Sixty-Five With Metal Bracelet: Quick Look [01 733 7707 4064-07 8 20 18]

The Oris Divers Sixty-Five (With Metal Bracelet) [01 733 7707 4064-07 8 20 18] held in the hand with a black bacground

Quick Look Review: The Oris Divers Sixty-Five with a Stainless Steel Bracelet

[01 733 7707 4064-07 8 20 18]

Having previously compleated a review of the Divers Sixty-Five with a rubber strap on this page the photos here are to show what it looks like on the Oris metal bracelet available.

‘The updated Oris Divers Sixty-Five manages the tough balancing act of updating a classic design, with modern manufacturing techniques, for an audience with different ideals. While not diluting the original spirit and charm of the 50-year-old design icon. ‘

The Oris Divers Sixty-Five (With Metal Bracelet) [01 733 7707 4064-07 8 20 18] Bracelet Pulled Strait To One Side

Oris Divers Sixty-Five laying on its side on a black leather surface [01 733 7707 4064-07 4 20 18]

The Oris Divers Sixty-Five is produced with either a black or a blue and grey faced dial. It comes supplied with either a black NATO-style nylon strap with a push button deployant buckle, a black or khaki fabric strap with a tang buckle, a black rubber ‘tropic’ strap, or a stainless steel bracelet with a push button deployant buckle.

These photos are of the Oris Divers Sixty-Five [01 733 7707 4064-07 8 20 18] on a stainless steel strap.  Continue reading Oris Divers Sixty-Five With Metal Bracelet: Quick Look [01 733 7707 4064-07 8 20 18]

Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Stainless Steel: Hands-On Review [116520 Black]

Hands-On Review: Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Stainless Steel ref. 116520 (Black) - Rolex Daytona sitting on its supplied box

Rolex Daytona Stainless Steel Review

Hands-On Review: Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Stainless Steel [116520 Black]

The Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Stainless Steel is perhaps one of the most desirable luxury watches in the world and one of the most recognisable chronograph watches along with the Omega Professional Speedmaster. It is renowned for Rolex purposefully limiting the supply to increase its scarceness and thus maintain a high value.

Hands-On Review: Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Stainless Steel ref. 116520 (Black) - Sitting on green rolex box
Daytona Stainless Steel ref. 116520 (Black) Review – Sitting on Rolex Box

From a high-street jeweller, a waiting time of 2 years plus is to be expected. If brought from us expect a wait of a significantly shorter 4 weeks, and if it’s not in stock then a 4 to 6-week wait is the norm. The reason we can get Rolex Daytonas so quickly is because of our large network of Authorised Dealers who each hold stock and buy in bulk. We will source the Daytona you want, from the Authorised Dealer with the shortest waiting time and best price, with all its warranty papers included.

Of all the Daytonas it’s the stainless steel variants that are the most highly sought after and hardest to acquire – being highly prized by watch collectors. The completely stainless steel Daytonas come in just two colour options with either a Black or White-faced dial.

The Cosmograph Daytona was designed with a clear purpose in mind – to be a robust reliable watch that is able to measure and calculate an elapsed period of time accurately, and to make an average speed calculation with the use of a tachymeter bezel. It accomplishes this feat with the assistance of the Rolex calibre 4130 that beats at 28,800 vph and is composed of 290 parts. Where’s the design of most luxury watches is to be as complicated as possible with the highest number of parts – the Daytona is a tool watch and is built to keep good time even after taking a beating. Inside it contains 44 Jewels and has an approximate power reserve of 72 hours, which decreases to a total running time of 66 hours with the chronograph function running.

The 4130 Caliber movement used in the Daytona was the first in Rolex’s history to use ceramic ball bearings for the automatic winding process. These tougher bearings mean the watch will require less maintenance, and will be more reliable compared to the normal steel ball bearings. Continue reading Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Stainless Steel: Hands-On Review [116520 Black]

Oris Divers Sixty-Five: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 4 20 18]

Oris Divers Sixty-Five closeup sitting on black leather [01 733 7707 4064-07 4 20 18]

An Affordable Charismatic Divers Watch!

Hands-On Review: Oris Divers Sixty-Five [01 733 7707 4064-07 4 20 18]

There’s a good reason why Oris is one of our best-selling brands on our site and the new Divers Sixty-Five is no exception, and really shows what Oris does best. Creating great mechanical watches at an affordable price point. Staying true to their outspoken slogan ‘real watches for real people’.

The updated Oris Divers Sixty-Five manages the tough balancing act of updating a classic design, with modern manufacturing techniques, for an audience with different ideas. While not diluting the original spirit and charm of the 50-year-old design icon.

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The coated brass case has been replaced with the more modern stainless steel, and the case back is thankfully solid and without an exhibition window. Whilst Oris could defiantly have added one this would have significantly inflated the price and is really not required on a practical dive watch.

Oris Divers Sixty-Five closeup sitting on black leather [01 733 7707 4064-07 4 20 18]

The case size has been increased to a modest 40mm diameter, any larger and they risked stretching out the original design too thin. The plexiglass crystal from the mid 60’s has also been updated to a more modern sapphire crystal with a strong double dome and anti-reflective coatings. The crystals unusual uniqueness really sets this watch apart from other similar watches in the diving watch market today, and really gives the Oris this great charm that is hard to replicate. The bi-directional bezel has been changed into a unidirectional and has an aluminium bezel insert added to it. Continue reading Oris Divers Sixty-Five: Hands-On Review [01 733 7707 4064-07 4 20 18]